New year, same shit?

THOUGH NEW YEAR’S EVE seems an especially happy time for some–a time when people turn a new leaf and are fortunate enough to self improve–many issues remain heading into 2018: homelessness, climate change, a widening wage gap, a burgeoning police state, and the still-surreal problem of an orange-skinned, Fox and Friends fiend continuing to have access to a very large and very, very powerful, nuclear button.

 

But keep your head up, reader.  There’s still plenty of opportunity for community love and unselfish acts of kindness. Why should an arbitrary change in date be the catalyst for change?


Port Authority Counter Terrorism units were all over the 34th and Herald subway station. The holiday and recent pipe-bomb explosion in the Port Authority station appear to justify these militarized gentlemen. The officer’s mean mug seemed a great photo opportunity. Likewise, the man to his left looks lifeless, something like a robot.

 

A couple waits for the F train at Delancey.

 

Lights on the 50th floor reflect on the window. Apartments like this one cost hundreds of thousands, if not millions of dollars, and look down on the rest of the city.

 

On New Year’s Eve, a woman walks towards the Times Square mayhem.

 

A couple embraces post midnight countdown. People laughed, cried, screamed, kissed, hugged, snapchatted and instagrammed. 2017:  Some fucked up things end up beautiful.

 

NYC’s Sanitation Department had their work cut out for them after Time Square’s New Year’s celebration. Where does all that trash go?

 

“Don’t drink and drive: take the subway but don’t fall in the tracks.” This inebriated man told the MTA worker that it’s been ten years since he was last in New York City. He said he came to see his family.

 

Champagne is the obvious choice for New Year’s, especially in the subway.

 

New Year’s can be a catalyst for change, some resolutions more obvious than others. Happy New Year.

 


 
 
Nolan Ryan Trowe is a photographer based in New York City. He can be contacted at nrt252@nyu.edu
 
 
Bruce Graves is a writer and web developer based in Los Angeles. He can be contacted at bruce@entropicmagazine.com.
 
 

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